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Celebrating Tulsi Vivah

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Tulsi is a symbol of purity and is well-known for its medicinal benefits and sacredness. Like any other marriage, this marriage too is celebrated with a lot of pomp and show signifying God’s love towards purity and sacredness.



The legend behind...

The legend behind this ceremonial practice talks about the story of King Jalandhar, who had received a boon that he will remain immortal until his wife Vrinda remains chaste – Pati Vrat. This made him very arrogant and he started to misuse his powers. Thus, it became imperative to get him defeated and the responsibility of performing this act fell off the able shoulders of Lord Vishnu.

Lord Vishnu disguised himself as Jalandhar and came in front of Vrinda. She mistook him for her husband and they started living as man and wife. Soon afterward, Jalandhar got defeated in a battle and was killed. Seeing this turn of events, Vrinda got very angry and cursed Lord Vishnu and turned him into Shaligram (sacred stones found in the Kali and Gandaki rivers in the Himalayan stream).

In spite of this curse, Lord Vishnu wanted to ensure that Vrinda shouldn’t suffer as she was not at all at fault. So he blessed her saying that she would find a place in every household, would be worshiped by all families and transformed her into a Tulsi plant.

Tulsi Vivah signifies this sacred relationship between Lord Vishnu and Vrinda and performing this holy ritual is considered as equal to performing Kanyadan, which as per Hindu customs, is one of the most auspicious tasks where parents give their daughter’s hand in the hands of an eligible boy.

How is Tusli Vivah festival celebrated?

1. This festival is celebrated by sprinkling cow dung water all around the courtyard.  
2. The Tulsi pot is painted in white color since the color attracts positive energies.
3. A sober and satvik rangoli is drawn around the Tulsi plant.
4. Sitting westwards the pooja rituals are performed with utmost devotion and dedication.
5. Finally the following prayer is recited to Lord Shrikrishna: “Hey Shrikrishna, Hey Tulsi Devi, the energy that I imbibe from you today, let it be used for the protection of Dharma and the nation.” 

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